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Icons of Life

A Cultural History of Human Embryos

Lynn Morgan

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University of California Press img Link Publisher

Geisteswissenschaften, Kunst, Musik / Pädagogik

Beschreibung

Icons of Life tells the engrossing and provocative story of an early twentieth-century undertaking, the Carnegie Institution of Washington's project to collect thousands of embryos for scientific study. Lynn M. Morgan blends social analysis, sleuthing, and humor to trace the history of specimen collecting. In the process, she illuminates how a hundred-year-old scientific endeavor continues to be felt in today's fraught arena of maternal and fetal politics. Until the embryo collecting project-which she follows from the Johns Hopkins anatomy department, through Baltimore foundling homes, and all the way to China-most people had no idea what human embryos looked like. But by the 1950s, modern citizens saw in embryos an image of "ourselves unborn," and embryology had developed a biologically based story about how we came to be. Morgan explains how dead specimens paradoxically became icons of life, how embryos were generated as social artifacts separate from pregnant women, and how a fetus thwarted Gertrude Stein's medical career. By resurrecting a nearly forgotten scientific project, Morgan sheds light on the roots of a modern origin story and raises the still controversial issue of how we decide what embryos mean.

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Schlagwörter

science, johns hopkins anatomy department, embryology, specimen collecting, biology, embryo babies, medical care, medial treatment, social artifacts, pregnant women, fetal politics, embryo production factory, gertrude stein, baltimore foundling homes, scientific study, united states of america, icons of life, ourselves unborn, 20th century scientific history, 20th century american history, healthcare, mount holyoke collection, carnegie institute of washington, maternal politics, pregnancy, embryo collection