Fabricating Consumers

The Sewing Machine in Modern Japan

Andrew Gordon

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University of California Press img Link Publisher

Geisteswissenschaften, Kunst, Musik / Regional- und Ländergeschichte

Beschreibung

Since its early days of mass production in the 1850s, the sewing machine has been intricately connected with the global development of capitalism. Andrew Gordon traces the machine’s remarkable journey into and throughout Japan, where it not only transformed manners of dress, but also helped change patterns of daily life, class structure, and the role of women. As he explores the selling, buying, and use of the sewing machine in the early to mid-twentieth century, Gordon finds that its history is a lens through which we can examine the modern transformation of daily life in Japan. Both as a tool of production and as an object of consumer desire, the sewing machine is entwined with the emergence and ascendance of the middle class, of the female consumer, and of the professional home manager as defining elements of Japanese modernity.

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Schlagwörter

japan social history, japanese history, japanese females, modern japan, dress and textiles, history of capitalism, sewing machine history, company business profiles, consumerism history, history of anthropology, 19th century japan, japanese class structure, 19th century women, japanese women, women in workplace, middle class, female consumer, business infrastructure, east asia, socioeconomic change, western dress, history of fashion, fashion and clothing, japanese role of women, corporate innovation