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Robo sapiens japanicus

Robots, Gender, Family, and the Japanese Nation

Jennifer Robertson

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University of California Press img Link Publisher

Geisteswissenschaften, Kunst, Musik / Pädagogik

Beschreibung

Japan is arguably the first postindustrial society to embrace the prospect of human-robot coexistence. Over the past decade, Japanese humanoid robots designed for use in homes, hospitals, offices, and schools have become celebrated in mass and social media throughout the world.  In Robo sapiens japanicus, Jennifer Robertson casts a critical eye on press releases and public relations videos that misrepresent robots as being as versatile and agile as their science fiction counterparts. An ethnography and sociocultural history of governmental and academic discourse of human-robot relations in Japan, this book explores how actual robots—humanoids, androids, and animaloids—are “imagineered” in ways that reinforce the conventional sex/gender system and political-economic status quo. In addition, Robertson interrogates the notion of human exceptionalism as she considers whether “civil rights” should be granted to robots. Similarly, she juxtaposes how robots and robotic exoskeletons reinforce a conception of the “normal” body with a deconstruction of the much-invoked Theory of the Uncanny Valley.

 
 

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Schlagwörter

press releases, androids, humanity, robots in hospitals, japan, human robot coexistence, public relations video, sociocultural history, human exceptionalism, robotic exoskeletons, humanoid robots, robots in the home, science fiction, postindustrial society, gender norms, family, robots in schools, robots in offices, japanese, japanese culture, theory of the uncanny valley, civil rights, ethnographic research, robot, mass media, social media, animaloids, gender studies, scientists