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Letters from Langston

From the Harlem Renaissance to the Red Scare and Beyond

Langston Hughes

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University of California Press img Link Publisher

Sachbuch / 20. Jahrhundert (bis 1945)

Beschreibung

Langston Hughes, one of America's greatest writers, was an innovator of jazz poetry and a leader of the Harlem Renaissance whose poems and plays resonate widely today. Accessible, personal, and inspirational, Hughes’s poems portray the African American community in struggle in the context of a turbulent modern United States and a rising black freedom movement. This indispensable volume of letters between Hughes and four leftist confidants sheds vivid light on his life and politics.

Letters from Langston begins in 1930 and ends shortly before his death in 1967, providing a window into a unique, self-created world where Hughes lived at ease. This distinctive volume collects the stories of Hughes and his friends in an era of uncertainty and reveals their visions of an idealized world—one without hunger, war, racism, and class oppression.

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Schlagwörter

harlem, peoples theater harlem, af am lit, african american lit, black arts, letters, red scare, peoples poet, black radical organizing, nebby crawford, william l patterson, jazz poetry, black authors, epistolary, black anti facism, mccarthyism, poetry, matt crawford, black communists, langston hughes, evelyn crawford, african american poet, nonfiction, louise thompson, alternative history of american left, american poet, american left, drama, black poets, black writers, civil rights, harlem renaissance