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This City Belongs to You

A History of Student Activism in Guatemala, 1944-1996

Heather Vrana

EPUB
ca. 37,99
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University of California Press img Link Publisher

Sachbuch / Sonstiges

Beschreibung

Between 1944 and 1996, Guatemala experienced a revolution, counterrevolution, and civil war. Playing a pivotal role within these national shifts were students from Guatemala’s only public university, the University of San Carlos (USAC). USAC students served in, advised, protested, and were later persecuted by the government, all while crafting a powerful student nationalism. In no other moment in Guatemalan history has the relationship between the university and the state been so mutable, yet so mutually formative. By showing how the very notion of the middle class in Guatemala emerged from these student movements, this book places an often-marginalized region and period at the center of histories of class, protest, and youth movements and provides an entirely new way to think about the role of universities and student bodies in the formation of liberal democracy throughout Latin America.

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Schlagwörter

university of san carlos, guatemala, activists, prosecution, civil war, revolution, violence, 1940s, politics, legal issues, university, student revolt, student movement, 1960s, youth movements, political upheaval, wartime, public university, liberal, latin america, nationalism, law and order, government, student body, usac, activism, middle class, counter revolution, arrest, guatemalan history, 1950s, south america, marginalized voices, 20th century, students, democracy