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Time and Power

Visions of History in German Politics, from the Thirty Years' War to the Third Reich

Christopher Clark

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ca. 18,99
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Princeton University Press img Link Publisher

Geisteswissenschaften, Kunst, Musik / Geschichte

Beschreibung

From the author of the national bestseller The Sleepwalkers, a book about how the exercise of power is shaped by different concepts of time

This groundbreaking book presents new perspectives on how the exercise of power is shaped by different notions of time. Acclaimed historian Christopher Clark draws on four key figures from German history—Friedrich Wilhelm of Brandenburg-Prussia, Frederick the Great, Otto von Bismarck, and Adolf Hitler—to look at history through a temporal lens and ask how historical actors and their regimes embody unique conceptions of time.

Inspired by the insights of Reinhart Koselleck and François Hartog, two pioneers of the “temporal turn” in historiography, Clark shows how Friedrich Wilhelm rejected the notion of continuity with the past, believing instead that a sovereign must liberate the state from the entanglements of tradition to choose freely among different possible futures. He demonstrates how Frederick the Great abandoned this paradigm for a neoclassical vision of history in which sovereign and state transcend time altogether, and how Bismarck believed that the statesman’s duty was to preserve the timeless permanence of the state amid the torrent of historical change. Clark describes how Hitler did not seek to revolutionize history like Stalin and Mussolini, but instead sought to evade history altogether, emphasizing timeless racial archetypes and a prophetically foretold future.

Elegantly written and boldly innovative, Time and Power takes readers from the Thirty Years’ War to the fall of the Third Reich, revealing the connection between political power and the distinct temporalities of the leaders who wield it.

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Schlagwörter

Mein Kampf, Civil society, Injunction, Rapprochement, Matthew Carter, Philosopher, Protestantism, Historical thinking, Corporatism, Germans, Jews, Narrative, Calculation, Cultural history, Fatherland, Political philosophy, Historicism, Prussia, Pomerania, Gregorio Leti, Hegemony, House of Hohenzollern, States of Germany, Typeface, Early modern Europe, Totalitarianism, Subsidy, Sensibility, Reinhart Koselleck, Princeton University Press, Italian Fascism, Juan de Mariana, Nazi Germany, Weimar Republic, Type design, P. J. Conkwright, Foreign policy, Historiography, Frederick the Great, Archaeology, Philosophy of history, Prehistory, Nation state, Rhetoric, Thomas Hobbes, John Lothrop Motley, Teleology, The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Brandenburg-Prussia, Joseph Goebbels, Modernity, Newspaper, Apotheosis, Typography, Sovereignty, Tax, Literature, The Estates, The Other Hand, Dictatorship, Font Bureau, Nazi Party, Thirty Years' War, Political culture, Military occupation, Nazism, Treatise, Calvinism, Publication, Louis XIV of France, Prussian estates, Modernism, J. (newspaper), Awareness, Otto von Bismarck, Ruler, Principality, Power projection, Uncertainty, Treaty, War, Career, Politics, Westphalian sovereignty, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Holy Roman Empire, Adolf Hitler, Historian, Historicity, Criticism, Philosophy, Sanssouci, Superiority (short story), Political religion, Monarchy, Writing, Nobility, Scotch Roman, Political history, Temporality