img Leseprobe Leseprobe

How to Think about God

An Ancient Guide for Believers and Nonbelievers

Marcus Tullius Cicero

EPUB
ca. 16,99
Amazon iTunes Thalia.de Weltbild.de Hugendubel Bücher.de ebook.de kobo Osiander Google Books Barnes&Noble bol.com Legimi yourbook.shop
* Affiliatelinks/Werbelinks
Hinweis: Affiliatelinks/Werbelinks
Links auf reinlesen.de sind sogenannte Affiliate-Links. Wenn du auf so einen Affiliate-Link klickst und über diesen Link einkaufst, bekommt reinlesen.de von dem betreffenden Online-Shop oder Anbieter eine Provision. Für dich verändert sich der Preis nicht.

Princeton University Press img Link Publisher

Geisteswissenschaften, Kunst, Musik / Philosophie

Beschreibung

A vivid and accessible new translation of Cicero’s influential writings on the Stoic idea of the divine

Most ancient Romans were deeply religious and their world was overflowing with gods—from Jupiter, Minerva, and Mars to countless local divinities, household gods, and ancestral spirits. One of the most influential Roman perspectives on religion came from a nonreligious belief system that is finding new adherents even today: Stoicism. How did the Stoics think about religion? In How to Think about God, Philip Freeman presents vivid new translations of Cicero's On the Nature of the Gods and The Dream of Scipio. In these brief works, Cicero offers a Stoic view of belief, divinity, and human immortality, giving eloquent expression to the religious ideas of one of the most popular schools of Roman and Greek philosophy.

On the Nature of the Gods and The Dream of Scipio are Cicero's best-known and most important writings on religion, and they have profoundly shaped Christian and non-Christian thought for more than two thousand years, influencing such luminaries as Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Dante, and Thomas Jefferson. These works reveal many of the religious aspects of Stoicism, including an understanding of the universe as a materialistic yet continuous and living whole in which both the gods and a supreme God are essential elements.

Featuring an introduction, suggestions for further reading, and the original Latin on facing pages, How to Think about God is a compelling guide to the Stoic view of the divine.

Weitere Titel von diesem Autor
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Weitere Titel zum gleichen Preis
Cover Philosophical Ideas
Thora Ilin Bayer
Cover Language and the World
Richard L Epstein
Cover Stanisław Brzozowski
Alexander Karl Golec
Cover How to Think
Tom Chatfield
Cover How to Think
Tom Chatfield
Cover How to Tell a Joke
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Cover Democracia sin demos
Catherine Colliot-Thélène
Cover After Law
Laurent de Sutter
Cover After Law
Laurent de Sutter

Kundenbewertungen

Schlagwörter

Writing, Gaius Flaminius, Third Macedonian War, Asia Minor, Cybele, Absolute (philosophy), 45 BC, 217 BC, Determination, Roman consul, Cicero, Epicurus, Strait, Sulla, Latin literature, Treatise, Second Punic War, 133 BC, Human spirit, Tiberius Gracchus, Pythagoras, De fato, Firmament, Calchas, First Punic War, Supporter, Augur, Gauls, Meteorology, Timaeus (historian), Atheism, Mopsus, Narrative, Manius Manilius, Southern Italy, Skepticism, Augury, Annals (Tacitus), Moisture, Chrysippus, Deity, Jason and the Argonauts (miniseries), Pollution, The Various, Workmanship, Apotheosis, Greek Philosophy, De Divinatione, By Nature, 63 BC, Scipio Aemilianus, God, Obstacle, Caucasus Mountains, Battle of Sentinum, Masinissa, Temperate climate, Stoicism, Roman Empire, Prediction, De re publica, 51 BC, Dictatorship, Ennius, All things, Impiety, Lucretius, Be star, Religion, Roman army, 168 BC, Philosopher, Princeton University Press, Zeno of Citium, Numidia, Cleanthes, Tiresias, Eloquence, Rhetoric, Ruler, Certainty, Third Punic War, De Natura Deorum, Amphiaraus, Winter solstice, Orbit of Venus, Agriculture (Chinese mythology), Platonic Academy, Reincarnation, Celestial sphere, Posidonius, 295 BC, Lightness (philosophy)