img Leseprobe Leseprobe

How to Tell a Joke

An Ancient Guide to the Art of Humor

Marcus Tullius Cicero

EPUB
ca. 17,99
Amazon iTunes Thalia.de Weltbild.de Hugendubel Bücher.de ebook.de kobo Osiander Google Books Barnes&Noble bol.com Legimi yourbook.shop
* Affiliatelinks/Werbelinks
Hinweis: Affiliatelinks/Werbelinks
Links auf reinlesen.de sind sogenannte Affiliate-Links. Wenn du auf so einen Affiliate-Link klickst und über diesen Link einkaufst, bekommt reinlesen.de von dem betreffenden Online-Shop oder Anbieter eine Provision. Für dich verändert sich der Preis nicht.

Princeton University Press img Link Publisher

Geisteswissenschaften, Kunst, Musik / Philosophie

Beschreibung

Timeless advice about how to use humor to win over any audience

Can jokes win a hostile room, a hopeless argument, or even an election? You bet they can, according to Cicero, and he knew what he was talking about. One of Rome’s greatest politicians, speakers, and lawyers, Cicero was also reputedly one of antiquity’s funniest people. After he was elected commander-in-chief and head of state, his enemies even started calling him “the stand-up Consul.” How to Tell a Joke provides a lively new translation of Cicero’s essential writing on humor alongside that of the later Roman orator and educator Quintilian. The result is a timeless practical guide to how a well-timed joke can win over any audience.

As powerful as jokes can be, they are also hugely risky. The line between a witty joke and an offensive one isn’t always clear. Cross it and you’ll look like a clown, or worse. Here, Cicero and Quintilian explore every aspect of telling jokes—while avoiding costly mistakes. Presenting the sections on humor in Cicero’s On the Ideal Orator and Quintilian’s The Education of the Orator, complete with an enlightening introduction and the original Latin on facing pages, How to Tell a Joke examines the risks and rewards of humor and analyzes basic types that readers can use to write their own jokes.

Filled with insight, wit, and examples, including more than a few lawyer jokes, How to Tell a Joke will appeal to anyone interested in humor or the art of public speaking.

Weitere Titel von diesem Autor
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero

Kundenbewertungen

Schlagwörter

Satire, Ridicule, Shtick, Chutzpah, Denarius, Deadpan, Idiot, Terence, Quintilian, Wit, Figure of speech, Author, Mark Antony, Newspeak, Princeton University Press, Cato the Younger, Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious, Congiarium, Poetry, Seriousness, Flaccus, Calvus, Marcus Caelius, Odysseus, Dolabella, Cicero, Plautus, Urbanity, Domitius Afer, De Oratore, Lyrics, Freedman, Ennius, Eloquence, Ambiguity, Sketch comedy, Clodius, Aesop's Fables, Plutarch, Livius Salinator, Nickname, Junius Bassus, Narrative, Battle of Pydna, Fabius Maximus, Phormio, Demosthenes, Jester, Humour, Joel Stein, Domitius Marsus, Gnaeus (praenomen), Trojan War, Freedom of speech, Cassius Severus, Lucius Licinius Crassus, Phormio (play), Scipio Aemilianus, Stupidity, Hyperbole, Allegory, Anecdote, Lockdown (Transformers), Pun, Philosopher, Scipio Africanus, Gaius Gracchus, Verres, Joke, Chrysippus (mythology), Lentulus, Prosecutor, Rutilius, The Other Hand, McMansion, Quintus Ligarius, Irony, Crass, Oileus, Suggestion, Macrobius, Murena (comic book), Naevius, Gaius Julius Caesar Strabo Vopiscus, Glaucia, Lucius Manlius (Acidinus), Disfigurement, Public speaking, Cincius, Bullying, Tiberius Gracchus, Acidinus, Translation (rhetoric device), Roman Empire, Proverb, Scaevola, Obscenity, Laughter, Catiline, Marcus Junius Brutus the Younger