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Till Death Do Us Part

American Ethnic Cemeteries as Borders Uncrossed

Allan Amanik (Hrsg.), Kami Fletcher (Hrsg.)

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University Press of Mississippi img Link Publisher

Geisteswissenschaften, Kunst, Musik / Pädagogik

Beschreibung

Contributions by Allan Amanik, Kelly B. Arehart, Sue Fawn Chung, Kami Fletcher, Rosina Hassoun, James S. Pula, Jeffrey E. Smith, and Martina Will de Chaparro

Till Death Do Us Part: American Ethnic Cemeteries as Borders Uncrossed explores the tendency among most Americans to separate their dead along communal lines rooted in race, faith, ethnicity, or social standing and asks what a deeper exploration of that phenomenon can tell us about American history more broadly.

Comparative in scope, and regionally diverse, chapters look to immigrants, communities of color, the colonized, the enslaved, rich and poor, and religious minorities as they buried kith and kin in locales spanning the Northeast to the Spanish American Southwest. Whether African Americans, Muslim or Christian Arabs, Indians, mestizos, Chinese, Jews, Poles, Catholics, Protestants, or various whites of European descent, one thing that united these Americans was a drive to keep their dead apart. At times, they did so for internal preference. At others, it was a function of external prejudice.

Invisible and institutional borders built around and into ethnic cemeteries also tell a powerful story of the ways in which Americans have negotiated race, culture, class, national origin, and religious difference in the United States during its formative centuries.

Weitere Titel von diesem Autor
Allan Amanik

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Schlagwörter

African American, property rights, Rural, Baltimore, Polish, Catholic, funerary rituals, Mount Auburn Cemetery, Arab American, separation, New Mexico, Race, Immigration, New York, Jewish, Undertaker and cemetery superintendents, United States, Garden Cemetery, Indian, Family, Property ownership, Slavery, Death and dying, Judaism, segregation, Chinese American, burial practices and burial reform, Catholicism, Religion in America