img Leseprobe Leseprobe

To Address You as My Friend

African Americans' Letters to Abraham Lincoln

Jonathan W. White (Hrsg.)

EPUB
ca. 25,99
Amazon iTunes Thalia.de Weltbild.de Hugendubel Bücher.de ebook.de kobo Osiander Google Books Barnes&Noble bol.com Legimi yourbook.shop
* Affiliatelinks/Werbelinks
Hinweis: Affiliatelinks/Werbelinks
Links auf reinlesen.de sind sogenannte Affiliate-Links. Wenn du auf so einen Affiliate-Link klickst und über diesen Link einkaufst, bekommt reinlesen.de von dem betreffenden Online-Shop oder Anbieter eine Provision. Für dich verändert sich der Preis nicht.

The University of North Carolina Press img Link Publisher

Geisteswissenschaften, Kunst, Musik / Pädagogik

Beschreibung

Many African Americans of the Civil War era felt a personal connection to Abraham Lincoln. For the first time in their lives, an occupant of the White House seemed concerned about the welfare of their race. Indeed, despite the tremendous injustice and discrimination that they faced, African Americans now had confidence to write to the president and to seek redress of their grievances. Their letters express the dilemmas, doubts, and dreams of both recently enslaved and free people in the throes of dramatic change. For many, writing Lincoln was a last resort. Yet their letters were often full of determination, making explicit claims to the rights of U.S. citizenship in a wide range of circumstances.

This compelling collection presents more than 120 letters from African Americans to Lincoln, most of which have never before been published. They offer unflinching, intimate, and often heart-wrenching portraits of Black soldiers' and civilians' experiences in wartime. As readers continue to think critically about Lincoln's image as the "Great Emancipator," this book centers African Americans' own voices to explore how they felt about the president and how they understood the possibilities and limits of the power vested in the federal government.

Kundenbewertungen

Schlagwörter

race relations, Frederick Douglass, colonization, crime in the District of Columbia, African Americans, Civil War and Reconstruction, black Christianity, conscription, black military experience, equal pay, race, Liberia, court-martial, Abraham Lincoln, African American charities, Port Royal Experiment, Christian ministry, black military recruitment, black enlistment, racial violence, military justice system, the Confederacy, Washington, D.C., economic rights, equality, American Colonization Society, presidential pardon power, self-emancipation, the Union