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The End of Work

Theological Critiques of Capitalism

John Hughes

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John Wiley & Sons img Link Publisher

Geisteswissenschaften, Kunst, Musik / Religion/Theologie

Beschreibung

Surveys twentieth century theologies of work, contrasting differingapproaches to consider the "problem of labor" from atheological perspective. * * Aimed at theologians concerned with how Christianity mightengage in social criticism, as well those who are interested in theconnection between Marxist and Christian traditions * Explores debates about labor under capitalism and considers therelationship between divine and human work * Through a thorough reading of Weber's Protestant WorkEthic, argues that the triumph of the "spirit of utility" iscrucial to understanding modern notions of work * Draws on the work of various twentieth century Catholicthinkers, including Josef Pieper, Jacques Maritain, Eric Gill, andDavid Jones * Published in the new and prestigious Illuminationsseries.

Rezensionen

(Times Literary Supplement, 29 July 2011)
"These two excellent books provide thematic indices of Christianways of understanding both power and work. They also illustrate howprofoundly the repertoire of Christianity and of its Judaic originspermeates contemporary society in spite of the impossibleprescriptions and false descriptions that declare religion confinedto the private realm."
Fergus Kerr,University of Oxford
"Adam was expelled from the garden of Eden to till the ground inthe sweat of his face, so the bible says, leaving us with centuriesof theological argument about how to relate the reality for so manypeople of work as toil, drudgery and effectively a curse, to theequally familiar experience of work as creative achievement andpersonal fulfilment. Post-Christian we may now be in Britain, yetin a society still reeling from de-industrialization, withunemployment endemic in certain quarters, with leisure activitiesexpanding vastly, and so on, there is a rich and complex Christiantradition of thinking about the nature of work which John Hughesputs back on the agenda in this provocative book."
Oliver O'Donovan, University ofEdinburgh
"John Hughes has written not about work but about the 'end' ofwork. But this is the most far-reaching question imaginable inpractical reason. To what end do we exert ourselves at all? What dowe hope to achieve? Through a tour of reading in nineteenth andtwentieth century thinkers that is as subtle and sympathetic as itis diverse and adventurous he has shown us how the ancient strugglebetween the fine and the useful has been played out dramatically inthe post-industrial West, and holds the key to a great deal that wethink of as modernity. Here is an exciting new voice contributingto the interpretation of our moral predicaments. I cannot imagineanyone putting Hughes' book down without having learnedsomething important."
Times Higher Education Supplement
"Its strength lies in its illuminating discussions of a fairlywide range of writers."
Fergus Kerr,University of Oxford
"Adam was expelled from the garden of Eden to till the ground inthe sweat of his face, so the bible says, leaving us with centuriesof theological argument about how to relate the reality for so manypeople of work as toil, drudgery and effectively a curse, to theequally familiar experience of work as creative achievement andpersonal fulfilment. Post-Christian we may now be in Britain, yetin a society still reeling from de-industrialization, withunemployment endemic in certain quarters, with leisure activitiesexpanding vastly, and so on, there is a rich and complex Christiantradition of thinking about the nature of work which John Hughesputs back on the agenda in this provocative book."
Oliver O'Donovan, University ofEdinburgh
"John Hughes has written not about work but about the 'end' ofwork. But this is the most far-reaching question imaginable inpractical reason. To what end do we exert ourselves at all? What dowe hope to achieve? Through a tour of reading in nineteenth andtwentieth century thinkers that is as subtle and sympathetic as itis diverse and adventurous he has shown us how the ancient strugglebetween the fine and the useful has been played out dramatically inthe post-industrial West, and holds the key to a great deal that wethink of as modernity. Here is an exciting new voice contributingto the interpretation of our moral predicaments. I cannot imagineanyone putting Hughes' book down without having learnedsomething important."
Times Higher Education Supplement
"Its strength lies in its illuminating discussions of a fairlywide range of writers."

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Schlagwörter

Moderne Theologie, Religion & Culture, Religion u. Kultur, Contemporary Theology, Religion u. Theologie, Religion & Theology